R: Your first web application with shiny

R: Your first web application with shiny

Data driven journalism doesn’t necessarily involve user interaction. The analysis and its results may be enough to write a dashing article without ever mentioning a number. But let’s face it: We love to interact with data visualizations! To build those, some basic knowledge of JavaScript and HTML is usually required.
What? Your only coding skills are a bit of R? No problemo! What if I told you there was a way to interactively show users your most interesting R-results in a fancy web app?

Shiny to the rescue

Shiny is a highly customizable web application framework that turns your analysis into an interactive web app. No HTML, no JavaScript, no CSS required — although you can use it to expand your app. Also, the layout is responsive (although it’s not perfect for every phone).

In this tutorial, we will learn step by step how to code the shiny app on Germany’s air pollutants emissions that you can see below.

Similarity and distance in data: Part 2

Similarity and distance in data: Part 2

Part 1 | Code

In part one of this tutorial, you learned about what distance and similarity mean for data and how to measure it. Now, let’s see how we can implement distance measures in R. We’re going to look at the built-in dist() function and visualize similarities with a ggplot2 tile plot, also called a heatmap.

Implementation in R: the dist() function

The simplest way to do distance measures in R is the dist() function. It works with matrices as well as data frames and has options for a lot of the measures we’ve gotten to know in the last part.

The crucial argument here is method. It has six options — actually more like four and a half, but you’ll see:

R: plotting with the ggplot2 package

R: plotting with the ggplot2 package

While crunching numbers, a visual analysis of your data may help you get an overview of your data or compare filtered information at a glance. Aside from the built-in graphics package, R has many additional packages to help you with that.
We want to focus on ggplot2 by Hadley Wickham, which is a very nice and quite popular graphics package.

Ggplot2 is based on a kind of statistical philosophy from a book I really recommend reading. In The Grammar of Graphics, author Leland Wilkinson goes deep into the structure of quantitative plotting. As a product, he establishes a rulebook for building charts the right way. Hadley Wickham built ggplot2 to follow these aesthetics and principles.