Your first interactive choropleth map with R

Your first interactive choropleth map with R

When it comes to data journalism, visualizing your data isn’t what it’s all about. Getting and cleaning your data, analyzing and verifying your findings is way more important.

Still, an interactive eye-catcher holding interesting information will definitely not hurt your data story. Plus, you can use graphics for a visual analysis, too.

Here, we’ll show you how to build a choropleth map, where your data is visualized as colored polygon areas like countries and states.
We will code a multilayer map on Dortmunds students as an example. You’ll be able to switch between layered data from different years. The popups hold additional information on Dortmunds districts.


R crash course: Vectors

R crash course: Vectors

Now that you installed RStudio, learned about assignments and wrote some basic code, there’s nothing stopping you from becoming a journocoder!

To get a deeper understanding of how R stores your data, we’re now going to take a closer look at data structures in R, starting with a central concept: Vectors.

Working with vectors

R crash course: Getting started

At journocode, we’re starting out with an intro to the tool we rely on most right now: The statistical programming language R. “R: A Language for Data Analysis and Graphics” is mostly used in statistics, but is very useful for journalists working with data as well.

You can install R here. Since it is open source, there are tons of packages with additional functions and possibilities. We will show you how to find and install them in the next chapters.